Fortune Magazine

  • 1446114474
  • 1446114901
  • 1446114955
  • 1446114522

Before: Hollywood Celebrities who touched a Peace of clay that was  placed onto the sculpture

After:  The  print  of  the  finished  sculpture  presented  to  HRH  Prince  Hussein of Jordan and others

DONALD BROWN’S MASTERWORK
“A SPORTING CHANCE FOR PEACE” IS
THE FLAGSHIP FOR GLOBAL PEACE INITIATIVE

The Master Sculptor, CEO of The Global
Gallery Limited, Looks Ahead to The Largest,
Simultaneous Print Unveilings Ceremony in History
On 2016’s International Day of Peace

World  renowned  sculptor  Donald  Brown  has  dedicated  his  multi‐faceted  career  as  an  artist  and globally  conscious  entrepreneur  to humanizing art for all people to understand and appreciate by making his works relevant to real life issues.  He is the CEO of The Global Gallery, Limited, a UK based organization  that incorporates the visual arts, performing arts and sport to address issues  that  include  building confidence and  self‐esteem,  striving  for excellence and creating positive role models.

A natural born teacher and visual storyteller, one of his best-known  works  is  his  evocative  breakthrough  sculpture  A  Genius  With  Four  Masters MA, which shows Marcus Garvey and Mahatma Gandhi high  in the background while in the foreground on either side Malcolm X  and  Dr.  Martin  Luther  King,  Jr.  pull  apart  prison  bars  so  Nelson  Mandela can climb out to freedom. This earned him a wide variety of  U.S. media attention, including a feature in Essence Magazine.

His works are owned by everyone from Gladys Knight and Wynton Marsalis to the parents of Tiger Woods and the mother of Michael Jordan to General Colin Powell.

Created over a period of four years, Brown’s recent sculpture “A Sporting Chance For Peace”  will be the flagship for a Global Peace Initiative, spearheaded by Brown. The sculpture, which blends the two  great passions of his life (art and sports) which also happen to have no geographical  boundaries, features a dynamic interaction of people engaged in various sporting activities  that function as symbols of human behaviour and ideals. Brown employs art and sport as vehicles  to promote peace and the positive principles that are taught through sports, such as respect, discipline humility and honesty.

In addition to being a Master Sculptor, Donald is also a World Class Masters Athlete.  In 2015 alone, he broke the British record for the 100 meter hurdles at the World Masters Outdoor Championships in Lyon France and won the 60 meter hurdles Gold Medal for Great Britain at the European Track and Field Championships in Poland.

EUROPEAN CHAMPION
60 METERS

Winners
Medals

donaldmedals

In addition  to encouraging patrons  to participate by ordering prints  (which come in three different sizes), Brown is travelling the world to  present copies to key dignitaries. Recently, he presented prints to the  Chief  of  Police  for  the  whole  of  Ghana,  one  of  the  most  peaceful  countries in the world, and to HRH Prince Hussein of Jordan, Founder  of Generation for Peace.

By 2017, Brown’s plan is for all 207 countries to have a replica of the  sculpture in their country. He hopes that exactly a year after the global  print unveiling, there will be a simultaneous sculpture unveiling across  the globe.

Brown  has  spent  many  years  as  a  motivational  speaker  doing  engagements throughout the world at schools, universities, churches  and other educational establishments.

In addition to the usual spiritual and emotional ways we perceive the  concept  of  peace,  Brown  is  also  dedicated  to  promoting  physical  peace.  To  that  end,  he  recently  produced  a  short  video  with  John  Amos  to  support  a  medical  facility  in  Greensboro,  NC.  He  is  also  looking to help build a medical community in Ghana that will be called  the HEAG Medical Community.

“When  people  discuss  peace,”  he  says,  “they  generally  think  about  conflict, but I am trying to talk about peace in its many forms, including  emotional,  spiritual,  personal,  social  and  physical  peace.  I  will  be  directing some of the proceeds from the prints of ‘A Sporting Chance  For Peace” to support specific organizations like these.”

Everything  Brown  does  is  geared  towards  forging  new  pathways  to  unite the world through art. He personally holds himself accountable  for  the  messages  he  presents  to  the  public  which  is  why  he  leans  decisively away from violence and profanity and towards creating art  and programs  that  have a  positive and enduring  social and  cultural  impact. “I believe that as artists, our voices are very powerful and influential,”  he says. “With that comes responsibility.”

The larger  themes  that inspired “A Sporting Chance of Peace” grew  out of the concerns raised by audience members at many of Brown’s  events. “I realized that there were a lot of real life issues that I could  address  through  sculptures,  such  as  self‐esteem,  confidence,  anger  management and relationships,” he says. “I’m a little different  from  the stereotypical reclusive artist  that  tucks himself away in a studio  and rarely interacts with the public. The sculpture is a culmination of  years  of  community  work  and  speaking  engagements  and  understanding how people did or did not relate to art. It goes back to  humanization and making sure it connects with real life concerns that  they can internalise and personalise.

“As an athlete myself,” Brown adds, “I knew sports was another ideal  vehicle  for  educating  young  people  on  principles  of  life.  In  other  words, to be good sports, you have to have all those qualities that are  essential for surviving in life, including forgiveness. One thing that has  always  puzzled  me  is  that  even  as  young  people  develop  these  principles in sports, when they encounter conflict on the street they  often don’t use those same principles to resolve the matter at hand. I  like  to imagine a world where we  don’t leave  those values  of good  sportsmanship on the field!”

“As an athlete myself,” Brown adds, “I knew sports was another ideal  vehicle  for  educating  young  people  on  principles  of  life.  In  other  words, to be good sports, you have to have all those qualities that are  essential for surviving in life, including forgiveness. One thing that has  always  puzzled  me  is  that  even  as  young  people  develop  these  principles in sports, when they encounter conflict on the street they  often don’t use those same principles to resolve the matter at hand. I  like  to imagine a world where we  don’t leave  those values  of good  sportsmanship on the field!”

Brown, a graduate of Wolverhampton University in England, started  on  his  truest  calling  at  age  11,  when  he  discovered  his  talent  for  sculpting in a woodworking class. He took a piece of wood home and  polished  and  shaped  it  until  it  was  round  and  smooth  and  shined.  When he was 13, he accidentally split the head of a figure of a man he  was carving. After his initial shock, she began to see the sculpture in a  fresh  new way, as an abstract  realistic  piece, with all  the veins and  striations laid bare. He used the accident to further the significance of  his work. By the time he was 14, a portrait of himself cast in resin had  appeared  on  national  TV  as  part  of  the  Children’s  Cadbury  Arts  exhibition, and many declared him a prodigy. “For me,” Brown says, “it’s never been about becoming a household  name but being someone people can identify with, who creates art  that makes a positive difference in their lives. My ongoing mission is  to use art to create positive change.”